Beat BT at their own game.



The Law


In some ways, I ought to thank BT for the utterly ignorant and rude way in which they treated us. After all, without their dreadful customer service and offshore complaints service, I would not have been 'inspired' to start to seek out the letter of the law on such contracts. I must admit, when I originally searched, I was not that hopeful, thinking that we may have been stitched up by BT murmuring some brief details of a new contract during the initial home move call. What I was about to find out was better than I imagined, and ultimately turned over BT's rotten treatment of us. It also empowers me (and potentially you) for any future problems with other companies.


Until 12th June 2014, distance selling was governed by:


  • the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000 and
  • the Cancellation of Contracts made in a Consumer's Home or Place of Work etc Regulations 2008.

From 13th June 2014, these were superseded by Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013.


You can download a copy of Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013 here. Or if you want to see if there is a newer version, then you can Google for 'consumer contracts 2013', or go to the GOV.UK website and find it manually.


On the next page, we'll have a look at exactly what obligations BT were under as a result of Consumer Contracts 2013, and I'll point to the parts of the regulations that dictate this.



 

BT Complaint ~ BT Customer Service ~ BT Problems ~ BT Unfair ~ British Telecom ~ Consumer Contracts 2013 ~ DSAR ~ Data Subject Access Request ~ BT House Move ~ BT Home Move